George Jung, the original “Blow” dead at 78

George Jung, the Infamous drug smuggler that inspired the movie “Blow” died at 78, cocaine, marijuana, weed, pot, plant, cannabis, blow

George Jung, the Infamous drug smuggler that inspired the movie “Blow” died at 78

Was the most famous drug dealer of all time could be George Jung? He was indicted by the plotline of his existence, which consists of several tenures in incarceration and a film adaptation as high profile. Jung died in Weymouth, his hometown, on Wednesday of this year 2021 at the age of 78. Over his entire life, he has been instrumental in transforming the distribution of cocaine—a crucial factor in Jung’s growing drug king Pablo Escobar.

People near to him, as well as a post on his Instagram page, the announcement of his death on social media. There was no reason, but the TMZ celebrity news site reports that liver and kidney failure had recently occurred.

Katharine Q. Seelye looked over the long and famous life of Jung at The New York Times. Briefly, his choice of drug was cannabis, with which his participation in the sale and trade. Jung’s apprehension in 1974 and put up with Carlos Lehder Rivas in Federal Prison. Whereas, Jung’s proposal there that what he had taught about contraband applies to another drug, cocaine. Seelye says their partnership “worked to shape the American drug scene by introducing huge amounts of cocaine that had been scarcely used until then.”

From the top of the word to the jail

Jung’s elevated offense was marked by several arrests of either marijuana or cocaine in huge volumes.  Subsequently, George served for almost 20 years before his last major arrest was in the mid-1990s; he was released in 2014. Two years later he was released from his halfway house for a violation of his freedom of speech. Since he wasn’t in prison.

In November, Deadline reported that he was on probation “and is continuing to fight his demons.” Whilst he came to view cocaine as “evil,” he never displayed public regret at the part he played to boost the nationwide coke epidemic of the 1980s.

George Jung, the Infamous drug smuggler that inspired the movie “Blow” died at 78, cocaine, marijuana, weed, pot, plant, cannabis, blow

The true story of the criminal life of George Jung

George Jacob Jung was conceived in Weymouth, South Boston, on August 6, 1942. Frederick, his father, ran a little company. His mother Jung was a homemaker, Ermine (O’Neill). George was a high-school star soccer player but he was accused of asking for a prostitute who was a police officer.

He studied advertising briefly after graduating from high school in 1961, at the University of Southern Mississippi, and soon dropped out. Meanwhile, he first learned how easily he could make money from drugs and sell a small amount of each stash of weed he had bought for his consumption.

Where everything begun

In 1967 he smuggled cannabis to New England where the price of the cannabis he bought in California was higher. Most of them were transported by a girlfriend who was a flight attendant.

He further extended his smuggling operation by flying drugs from Puerto Vallarta, Mexico, often using private airports that he stole in the Globe from Cape Cod. This hot streak ended in 1974 with his first arrest on drugs charged with having a cannabis trunk in Chicago. Jung landed in Danbury’s federal prison, Conn., which for all the traffic tricks he picked up there he called “the crime school.”

Carlos Lehder was his cellmate who already had a lot of cocaine experience and made a quick friendship.

Mr. Jung told PBS, in 2000: “There was a way he was looking to transport cocaine and to sell it out of Colombia and I was there.” “It’s been like heavenly marriage, or finally hell.” (Mr. Jung would eventually betray Mr. Lehder by declaring a lesser punishment against him

Out and about with higher stakes

After being released in 1976, the American drug scene was altered by Mr. Jung and Mr. Lehder, which had been used little until then. They joined forces with Mr. Escobar and their trade grew exponentially. A deeper sense of danger and excitement came with the higher stakes. Although Mr. Jung told PBS “looked like Bela Lugosi,” he would still attract good-looking women.

High Supplies
George Jung, the Infamous drug smuggler that inspired the movie “Blow” died at 78, cocaine, marijuana, weed, pot, plant, cannabis, blow

In 2001 his love for money and cocaine becomes a movie

Jung, directed by the late Ted Demme and starred by Johnny Depp, was the subject of Blow’s film in 2001. The film proved controversial, many focusing on the real person in its focus. Roger Ebert writes on the film’s release, “Failure is George Jung’s. “He wouldn’t become one person that was interesting enough to make a film about all the glory of his success and the poignancy of his collapse.”

David Edelstein wrote in Slate, criticizing Jung and the film especially for “one of the most verbose pieces of male victimization ever staged.”

Jung was calling himself an outlaw. The Times quotes an interview from 1993 in Boston Globe, in which Jung said, “A gangster is a robber. I never took it. I never took it. I gave only.” The phrase “#the last #outlaw” was written on the Instagram post announcing his death.

Seelye notes at the Times that “[he] never publicly regretted his role in fueling it nationally, coke outbreak of the 1980s.” As reputations go, this is particularly distressing.

This hasn’t been seen by others.

George Jung, the Infamous drug smuggler that inspired the movie “Blow” died at 78, cocaine, marijuana, weed, pot, plant, cannabis, blow

The World encapsulated his career in the following manner: 'Jung powdered the nose of the wealthy, famous Hollywood, burned several fortunes and helped run the cartel

 “We all loved cocaine and of course money in that period — access to cars, clothing, dinners, and lifestyle,” he said. “Women, especially, are all loved for cocaine. “I wasn’t different basically from a rock star or film star. I was a coke star.” I was a coke star.”

George was embarrassed by his family particularly as the federal officers were constantly monitoring the house of his parents in search of him. This time around, his mother would not allow him to visit before his father died in 1988. In fact, he decided to only make an audiotape for him to communicate with his father. George tried to make amendments on the tape, but he never apologized.

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